Joker viewers around the globe WALK OUT of movie theatres | Daily Mail Online

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‘It’s way too terrifying’: Joker viewers around the globe WALK OUT of movie theatres and urge cinemas to BAN the controversial film… amid ongoing concerns over glamourising gun crime

Controversial movie Joker has caused further concern after fans stormed out of the cinema following its global release this weekend. 

Movie lovers flooded Twitter on Friday with comments about the film, which sees Joaquin Phoenix portray Arthur Fleck, the embattled clown who later transforms into Batman’s most iconic nemesis in the comic book world. 

Among a flurry of messages on the microblogging site, one fan wrote: ‘Literally just walked out of a screening of Joker. Way too terrifying to be there with all this going on the way the movie glamorizes gun violence and mental health issues.’

No laughing matter: Controversial movie Joker has caused further concern after fans stormed out of the cinema following its global release this weekend

Joker has been plagued with controversy due to the excessive violence and gun use, while others insist the movie forces viewers to sympathise with the antihero. 

Victims of the Aurora, Colorado, theater massacre that occurred during a 2012 Dark Knight Rises showing, have called on Warner Bros. to support gun control initiatives, which the studio says it already does.

A theater in Huntington Beach, California, cancelled two screenings Thursday night after receiving a threat, police said. Friday showings have resumed as scheduled.

It appears not only cancelled screenings are a problem as many fans have now revealed they stormed out of the cinema once they had started watching. 

Win: Joker unseated Venom, which also holds the record for best October opening with $80.3 million, according to Comscore 

Shocking: Among a flurry of messages on the microblogging site, one fan wrote: ‘Literally just walked out of a screening of Joker

Users penned: ‘Just walked out of #Joker. Haven’t been that anxious in a movie theater since GOOD TIME. F**k man… 

‘I’ve never walked out of a movie but with Joker I came very close… Would have walked out of the joker after an hour if the missus would have let me! #dontdoitfolks 

‘If I didn’t see Joker with a friend I probably would’ve walked out of the theater thinking someone should tell Trump to shut up… White dude next to me walked out of Joker in the last few minutes of the movie had me a little shook not gonna lie… 

‘I walked out of this movie #Joker BAN THIS MOVIE!! It’s a psychological approach on the mind! I was rooting for him until s**t got real… Oh man…

Interesting: Both Phoenix and director Todd Phillips have defended the film, with the actor saying he trusts audiences to know the difference between right and wrong

‘By unanimous decision, the four of us walked out of the Joker movie. I haven’t walked out of a movie in years… I have never walked out of a theater more uncomfortable than I am right now walking out of Joker…

‘What a f**ked up movie… Literally just walked out of a screening of Joker. Way too terrifying to be there with all this going on the way the movie glamorizes gun violence and mental health issues.’

Both Phoenix and director Todd Phillips have defended the film, with the actor saying he trusts audiences to know the difference between right and wrong.

Phillips recently revealed he was surprised by the criticism of Joker because he took measures to instill ‘real-world implications’ of violence not often found in cartoon films and television shows.

Jokes: Despite receiving critical acclaim, social media monitoring FBI agents in the US have warned it could inspire screening attacks from incels – a term which refers to men who are ‘involuntarily celibate’ and blame their situation on women

The 48-year-old director revealed during the New York Film Festival on Wednesday night that his depictions of violence were a needed departure from the glorification found in other action movies.

Phoenix portrayed the character as bullied man Arthur Fleck who — after living on the outskirts of society — snaps and begins to take revenge on those who have wronged him.

‘That’s the surprising thing to me,’ he said at the movie’s East Coast premiere. ‘I thought, isn’t that a good thing, to put real-world implications on violence?’

Interesting: Phillips feels as though he has acted responsibility as a creative to show audiences what the real implications of violence are

Phillips feels as though he has acted responsibility as a creative to show audiences what the real implications of violence are.

‘Isn’t it a good thing to take away the cartoon element about violence that we’ve become so immune to? I was a little surprised when it turns into that direction, that it’s irresponsible,’ he said.

‘Because, to me, it’s very responsible to make it feel real and make it have weight and implications.’

Despite receiving critical acclaim, social media monitoring FBI agents in the US have warned it could inspire screening attacks from incels – a term which refers to men who are ‘involuntarily celibate’ and blame their situation on women.

Joker viewers around the globe WALK OUT of movie theatres

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